Monday, May 12, 2008

Solution of Exercise No.5

In Exercise-5 we presented twelve direct-mate problems. Their solutions follow:

(Problem 49)
Comins Mansfield,
1916
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (6+4)
[KR2B3/Bp6/Q7/8/8/8/5S1p/6kr]

Tries: {1.Rxb7? / Kxb7? / Qe2? / Qa1+? / Sh3+? Kg2!}, {1.Qf1+? / Qxb7? / Qg6+? K(x)f1!}.

Key: 1.Bc6! [2.Rg8# / Qa1# / Sh3#]
1...bxc6 2.Rg8#
1...b5 2.Qa1#
1...b6 2.Sh3#
1...bxa6 2.Rb1#
There is a Pickaninny pawn at b7. The three threats of the key are separated in the three variations and there is a defense which refutes all the threats of the key but allows another mate. This is the theme Karlström-Fleck.


(Problem 50)
Marble & Bettmann
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (5+2)
[7Q/2p5/1P1S3R/3k4/8/2K5/8/8]

Tries: {1.Qd4+? Kc6!}, {1.Qe5+? Kxe5!}, {1.Sc4? / Sf7? Ke4!}.

Key: 1.Qe8! (zugzwang).
1...Kc5 2.Qb5#
1...c5 2.Qe4#
1...c6 2.Qh5#
1...cxb6 2.Qb5#
1...cxd6 2.Rh5#
There is a Pickaninny pawn at c7.


(Problem 51)
Bettmann,
1915
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (13+2)
[4B3/3p4/2P1PQ2/P1k2P1R/4P1S1/1K4R1/5S1B/8]

In the set play: 1...dxc6 / dxe6 2 Qe5#

Tries: {1.Bxd7? / exd7? / Rc3+? Kb5!}, {1.Qd4+? Kxd4!}, {1.Qe5+? / Ka4? Kxc6!}.

Key: 1.Qd8! (zugzwang).
1...Kxc6 / Kb5 2.Qb6#
1...Kd6 2.Rc3#
1...Kd4 2.Qb6#
1...d5 2.Qxd5#
1...d6 2.Qb6#
1...dxc6 2.f6#
1...dxe6 2.fxe6#
There is a Pickaninny pawn at d7.


(Problem 52)
Comins Mansfield,
3rd Prize, Memorial L. Segal, Themes-64, 1962
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (7+3)
[8/4p2K/3P4/5kP1/2R1Sp2/1B3Q2/8/8]

Tries: {1.Rc5+? e5!}, {1.Qxf4+? Kxf4!}, {1.Qh3+? Ke5!}.

Key: 1.Sf6! (zugzwang).
1...Kxg5 2.Qxf4#
1...Ke5 / Ke6 2.Qd5#
1...e5 2.Qg4#
1...e6 2.Qxf4#
1...exd6 2.Qd5#
1...exf6 2.Rc5#
There is a Pickaninny pawn at e7.


(Problem 53)
C. Morse,
”The Problemist”, 1962
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (9+3)
[5Q2/4Bp2/4P1R1/4R3/4p1BP/4P1k1/8/6K1]

Tries: {1.Qh6? / Bb4? / Be2+? fxg6!}, {1.Rh5? f5!}.

Key: 1.Qb8! [2.Re5~# (goes anyplace except g5 and mates)]
1...f5 2.Rxf5#
1...f6 2.Rh5#
1...fxe6 2.Rxe6#
1...fxg6 2.Rxe4#
There is a Pickaninny pawn at f7.


(Problem 54)
Walther Martinus Johannes Jørgensen
Arbejder-Skak, 1950
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (10+8)
[6Q1/1S4p1/2R2S1P/5k2/3P1s1p/5RbP/5p1p/2B2K1s]

Phase of set play: * 1...g5 / g6 / gxf6 / gxh6 2.Qh7# / Qd5# / Sd6# / Qg4#

Phases of virtual play: Tries: {1.Qd5+? Kg6!}, {1.Sd6+? / Rc5+? Kxf6!}, {1.Qf7? gxf6!}, {1.Sf6~? K(x)e4!}, {1.Rxf4+? Bxf4!}.

Phase of actual play: Key: 1.Qe8! (zugzwang).
1...Kg5 2.Qh5#
1...g5 / g6 / gxf6 / gxh6 2.Qe4# / Qe5# / Rc5# / Qh5# (four changed mates)
There is a Pickaninny pawn at g7.


(Problem 55)
W. Tura,
First Prize, ”Europe Echecs”, 1962
(There is set play). White plays and mates in 2 moves
* #2 (10+11)
[2B1S1q1/2S1Pb2/1pP3rs/b3k1p1/r2p2R1/BR1p2K1/5Q2/8]

We spot two black Grimshaw intersections at squares b4 and e6 with set mates :
Phase of set play : * 1...Bb4 / Rb4 / Be6 / Re6 2.Qxd4# / Qe1# / Bd6# / Rb5#
(If White tries to exploit b4 as a Nowotny intersection, Black uses the Grimshaw intersection at e6 to close the line of Bc8 towards f5 and to make f5 a flight of the black King).

Phases of virtual play :
Try: {1.Bb4? [2.Qxd4# / Qe1#] Re6! (and there is no mate with 2.Rb5)}
Try: {1.Rb4? (same threats) Be6! (and there is no mate with 2.Bd6)}

There are several more tries: [1 Re4+? Kxe4!], [1 Rxg5+? Rxg5+!], [1 Rb5+? Bd5!], [1 Bd6+? Rxd6!], [1 Qe1+? Bxe1+!], [1 Qxd4+? Rxd4!], [1 Qe3+? dxe3!], [1 Qe2+? dxe2!], [1 Qf6+? Rxf6!], [1 Qf5+? Sxf5+!], [1 Qf4+? gxf4+!].

The key is a Nowotny intersection at e6, Black is defending with interferences at the white Grimshaw intersection b4, closing the line of Ba3 towards d6 and the line of Rb3 towards b5, but this square is also a black Grimshaw intersection, and the white Queen can execute one of the threats [2.Qxd4# / Qe1#].
Phase of actual play: Key: 1.Be6! [2.Rb5# / Bd6#] Bb4 / Rb4 2.Qxd4# / Qe1#.


(Problem 56)
M. Niemeijer,
First Prize, ”Tijdschrift v. d. N. S. B.”, 1928
White plays and mates in 3 moves
#3 (9+8)
[2b3K1/1pPkpp2/1P1P1RP1/3p1p1S/3S1p2/5P2/8/8]

Tries: {1.Re6? fxe6!}, {1.Rxf7? Kxd6!}.
Black pieces have no great mobility. If f7 was missing, black would only move the pawn e7 or Ke8.

Key: 1.gxf7! [2.f8=Q [3.Qxe7#]]
The beauty of the problem is that for each of the four moves of the Pickaninny pawn e7, white answers with a different promotion of f7, so the problem is an AUW!
1...e6 2.f8=Q e5 3.Qd8# / Qe7# / Rf7#
1...e5 2.f8=S+ Ke8 3.Sg7#
1...exd6 2.f8=R Ke7 3.R6f7#
1...exf6 2.f8=B Ke8 3.Sxf6#
The same pawn, on the same square, is promoted to four different pieces.


(Problem 57)
Ren A.
White plays and mates in 3 moves
#3 (6+5)
[8/8/6s1/8/8/2s3R1/4P2p/RbSQK2k]

The black King is cornered and a check will finish him. Which piece will give the mate?
Tries: {1.Kd2+? / Kf2+? / Sd3? Sxd1!}.

The Rook Ra1 is a revealer, because it reveals the thought of the composer to use castling. We note that Ra1 and Ke1 have many pieces between them, there is also the guarding of d1 by the Knight Sc3 (as we have seen during virtual play), so White has apparently no time to castle in three moves.
Or has he? Yes, if the key is checking.
Key: 1.Qd5+ Sxd5
2.Sd3 [3.Sf2] Bxd3
3.0-0-0#
The white pawn closes the diagonal d1 – f3 to stop [1.Qf3#].


(Problem 58)
Mertes
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (4+3)
[8/6r1/5Q1b/7k/8/5S1K/4S3/8]

Tries: {1.Qh4+? Kg6!}, {1.Qg5+? Bxg5!}, {1.Qxg7? Bxg7!}, {1.Qf5+? Bg5!}, {1.Qf7+? Rxf7!}, {1.Qxh6+? Kxh6!}, {1.Se5? Rg4!}, {1.Sg3+? Rxg3+!}, {1.Sf4+? Bxf4!}.
We do not need much time to locate the black Grimshaw intersection at g5. We exploit it as Nowotny intersection.
Key: 1.Sg5! [2.Sf4# / Sg3#]
1...Bxg5 / Rxg5 2.Sg3# / Sf4#.


(Problem 59)
Allan Werle,
”Tidskrift för Schack“, 1945
White plays and mates in 4 moves
#4 (2+2)
[8/4P3/8/8/8/8/3p1K2/7k]

Trying {1.e8=Q? d1=S+! 2.Kg3 Se3 3.Qxe3}, black is stalemated, because Qe3 guards g1. For this reason we prefer to have underpromotion at the key.

Key: 1.e8=R! [2.Rg8#] d1=S+
2.Kg3 Se3
3.Rxe3 Kg1
4.Re1#


(Problem 60)
J. A. Schiffmann,
”T N S B Chess Assn. Tourney”, 1929
White plays and mates in 2 moves
#2 (12+8)
[8/1s1Pp3/b3PkSP/R3S1p1/r2Q2P1/p5K1/B4B2/3r1R2]

Tries: {1.d8=Q? Sxd8!}, {1.Sd3+? Rxd4!}, {1.Be1+? Bxf1!}.

Key: 1.Sf8! [2.Sh7#]
1...Rc4 / Bc4 (closing the line of Ba2 towards e6) 2.Be1# / Sd3#
1...Rd3+ / Bd3 2.Be3# / Sc4#

The moves of the Rooks at c4, d3 are dealt by Bf2 which forms a battery with Rf1. The moves of the Ba6 at c4, d3 are dealt by Se5 which forms a battery with Qd4.
In this problem the theme TRD is presented:


Theme TRD : It is a double Grimshaw, which is formed from two Rooks and a Bishop, or from two Bishops and a Rook. (The theme is also called Three Rider Double).

The theme is named in honor of Thomas Rayner Dawson, very prolific British composer, who died in 1951. Dawson is considered the inventor of the fairy chess. The fairy chess uses many (over a thousand) fairy pieces or different chessboards or different conditions modifying the rules of the play.


[This post in Greek language].

No comments: