Wednesday, May 21, 2008

Versions

We have seen, in problem-22, the version by Iatridis, who has changed a pawn from black to white in order to give a solution to Dittrich's no-solution problem.

In the next two versions we will see other reasonings which have led some composers to create new versions of some problems.


(Problem 79)
Sam Loyd,
”Holyoke Transcript“, 1878
White plays and mates in 3 moves
#3 (13+4)
[8/6pK/4S1P1/1R1PP3/2PBkP2/3S2p1/6Pp/2R4Q]

32 Tries: {1.Sf2+? gxf2!}, {1.Qxh2? Kxd3!}, {1.f5? Kxf5!}, {1.Kh8? / Kxg7? / Kg8? / d6? / Rbb1? / Rb2? / Rb3? / Rb4? / Ra5? / Rc5? / Rb6? / Rb7? / Rb8? / Bf2? / Ba7? / Bb6? / Bc5? / Sb2? / Se1? / Sc5+? / Sb4? / Qe1+? / Ra1? / Rcb1? / Rc3? / Rc2? / Rd1? / Re1+? / Rf1? Ke4-f5!}
Key: 1.Rg1!
1...Kxc3 2.Ra1 (Bristol line clearance) K~ / Kxc4 / Ke2 3.Qb1# / Qf1# / Qd1#
1...Kf5 2.Sf2 (zugzwang) gxf2 / hxg1=S 3.g4# / Qh5#



(Problem 80)
C. Bull,
1878
White plays and mates in 3 moves
#3 (11+5)
[8/6pK/4p1P1/4P3/2P1kB2/1P1S2p1/4S1Pp/5R1Q]

22 Tries: {1.Sf2+? gxf2!}, {1.Bc1? / Bd2? / Bg5? / Sxg3+? / Qxh2? Kxd3!}, {1.Kh8? / Kxg7? / Kg8? / Sb2? / Sc1? / Se1? / Sc5+? / Sb4? / Sc1? / Ra1? / Rb1? / Rc1? / Rd1? / Re1? / Rf3? / Rf2? Kf5!}.
Key: 1.Rg1!
1...Kxc3 2.Ra1 (Bristol line clearance) K~ / Kxe2 3.Qb1# / Qf1#
1...Kf5 2.Sf2 (zugzwang) gxf2 / hxg1=S 3.g4# / Qh5#

The key and the main variations of Loyd's problem have been preserved, but Bull's position is more economical, not so heavy in white forces.




(Problem 81)
rev. Saavedra, (or position from the game [Potter vs Fenton])
1895
White plays and wins
+ (2+2)
[8/8/1KP5/3r4/8/8/8/k7]

Key: 1.c7! Rd6+
2.Kb5
(Not Ka7, because after Rd7 the pawn is lost,
not Ka6 / Ka5, because after Rc6 the pawn is lost,
not Kc5, because after [Rd1 and Rc1+] the pawn (or the promoted piece) is lost).
2...Rd5+ 3.Kb4 Rd4+ 4.Kb3 Rd3+ 5.Kc2
(Now the plan [Rd1 and Rc1+] is not applicable).
5...Rd4!
(Tricky move, because if 6.c8=Q Rc4+ 7.Qxc4 forced, and black is stalemated!)
6.c8=R [7.Ra8#] Ra4 7.Kb3 [8.Kxa4 / Rc1#] ± (white wins).



(Problem 82)
A. A. Troitzky,
”Ceske Slovo”, 1924
White plays and wins
+ (5+5)
[8/3b4/k2p3P/1p1K3P/1P4r1/8/3R4/8]

Key: 1.h7! Rg5+ 2.Kxd6 Rxh5 3.Kc7 [4.Ra2#] Be6 4.Kb8 [5.Rd6#] Bd5 5.Rxd5 Rxd5
6.h8=R [7.Rh6#] Rd6 7.Kc7 [8.Kxd6 / Ra8#] ± (white wins)

Troitzky has taken Saavedra's idea and has presented it in new form.


(This post in Greek language).

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